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Research: Understanding, Forecasting & Communicating Hypoxia Linkages

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Understanding, Forecasting and Communicating the Linkages Between Hypoxia and Ocean Acidification in Oregon's Coastal Ocean (2012-2014)

Dr. Francis Chan
Oregon State University
Zoology
3029 Cordley Hall
Corvallis, Oregon 97331
Phone: 541-737-9131
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Co-PI: Kristen Milligan, OSU, Zoology; Associate PI: John Barth, OSU

Hypoxia and ocean acidification represent two important perturbations to ecological communities and fisheries. In Oregon, scientists, policy-makers and the public express growing concern about hypoxia. But our understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification - on marine ecosystems in general and upwelling shelves in particular - remains poor, and that lack of understanding can hamper marine policy decisions.

Dr. Chan’s research team will work to understand the relationship between these two ecological processes and how they come into play in the emerging field of marine spatial planning, particularly along the Oregon shoreline and similar areas of the US West coast.

Dr. Chan’s research team will conduct sampling to assess the relationship between hypoxia and ocean acidification on the Oregon shelf. They will also conduct survey-based evaluations of public understanding and concerns related to these issues, and assess the effectiveness of outreach approaches dealing with the co-occurrence of hypoxia and ocean acidification. In so doing, Dr. Chan hopes to enhance the exchange of rapidly emerging scientific information on ocean acidification and hypoxia among researchers, resource managers, policy makers and the public.

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