Natural disasters could result in unnecessary loss of life and disproportionate suffering to families and communities if evacuation plans are not in place or understood by the public. In the Pacific Northwest, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami from the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) represents one of the most pressing natural disasters with an astonishing high 7%-12% chance of occurrence by 2060. This thesis presents an agent-based multi-modal near-field tsunami evacuation modeling framework in Netlogo. The goals of this study are two folded. The first objective is to investigate how (1) decision time, (2) choice of modes of transportation (i.e., walking and automobile), and in general (3) different variables involved in the evacuation scenario (e.g., walking speed and driving speed) impact the estimation of casualties. Using the city of Seaside, Oregon as a study site, which is one of the most vulnerable cities on the Oregon coast, different evacuation scenarios are included in the model to assess the impact of parameters involved on the mortality rate of the tsunami event.

Authors: 
Mostafizi, Alireza
Short Description: 
Natural disasters could result in unnecessary loss of life and disproportionate suffering to families and communities if evacuation plans are not in place or understood by the public.
Product Number: 
ORESU-Y-16-004
Entry Date: 
Monday, July 18, 2016
Price: 
NA
Length: 
94 pages
Size and Format: 
8.5 x 11, online
Department/University: 
Civil Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
Degree: 
Master of Science
Year of Publication: 
2016
How to Order: 

Available online from the National Sea Grant Library: https://eos.ucs.uri.edu/EOSWebOPAC/OPAC/Index.aspx

or from the Scholars Archive @ OSU website: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/59176