The December 2007 storm, otherwise known as the Great Coastal Gale of 2007, was a series of extratropical cyclones that brought highly unprecedented wind speeds and precipitation to the Oregon and Washington coasts of the United States.

A storm hindcast using the coupled Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) and Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) models was conducted within Tillamook Bay Oregon, from 28 November to 5 December 2007. ADCIRC computes two-dimensional circulation forced by astronomic tides, streamflow, and storm surge, while SWAN solves the wave action density equations for radiation stresses. Modeled non-tidal residuals were compared to observed data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at the Garibaldi, Oregon, tide gauge station. The relative contributions of meteorological forcing, offshore waves, and streamflow to storm tides were next assessed at four locations of interest within and outside the estuary by conducting a set of model runs where each major process was omitted in turn. The dominant mechanism for storm tides in the estuary was offshore wave breaking. Streamflow, locally (in estuary) generated waves, and locally generated surge led to minor variations in storm tides in the estuary.

Authors: 
Cheng, T. K., D. F. Hill, and W. Read
Short Description: 
Streamflow, locally (in estuary) generated waves, and locally generated surge led to minor variations in storm tides in the Tillamook Bay estuary.
Product Number: 
ORESU-R-15-005
Entry Date: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015
Price: 
NA
Length: 
17 pages
Size and Format: 
8.5 x 11, online
Source (Journal Article): 
Journal of Coastal Research, 31(3): 723-734, 2015
DOI Number (Journal Article): 
10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-14-00120.1
Year of Publication: 
2015
How to Order: 

Available upon request.