Metagenomics has revealed that the marine microbial biosphere is immensely more diverse than originally considered, and is an almost untapped reservoir for the potential discovery of microbial natural products. Despite numerous advances in culturing, biosynthetic engineering and genomic-based screening efforts to uncover much of this diversity in relatively accessible environments, a high rediscovery rate has resulted in the investigation of unique, relatively unexplored ecosystems harboring phylogenetically diverse communities of marine organisms. The focus of this research was to establish a culture repository of microorganisms collected from the Red Sea and from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and to assess their biosynthetic potential for the production of new chemical scaffolds. Cultivation of marine cyanobacteria from the Red Sea has led to the identification of five new cyclic depsipeptides, apratoxin H, grassypeptolides D and E, Ibu-epidemethoxylyngbyastin 3 and leptochelin, the latter possessing a unique chemical scaffold capable of binding metals. A collection of deepsea hydrothermal vent sediment and microbial mat samples led to the isolation of 64 unique bacterial strains, with eight assigned as members of the order Actinomycetales. Importantly, these isolates, along with a collection of deep-vent invertebrates and microbes, have led to the development of methods for the collection, culturing and biological screening of organisms from this extreme environment for future natural products research.

Authors: 
Christopher C. Thornburg
Short Description: 
The focus of this research was to establish a culture repository of microorganisms collected from the Red Sea and from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and to assess their biosynthetic potential for the production of new chemical scaffolds.
Product Number: 
ORESU-Y-13-002
Entry Date: 
Thursday, June 20, 2013
Price: 
NA
Length: 
298 pp.
Size and Format: 
8 1/2 x 11, online
Department/University: 
Pharmacy, Oregon State University
Degree: 
Doctor of Philosophy
Year of Publication: 
2013
How to Order: 

Free download from the National Sea Grant Library